Author Topic: 19th century  (Read 621 times)

Marcy Little

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19th century
« on: January 22, 2024, 03:07:10 pm »
As a woman's sissy in the 19th century, which would you prefer to wear?

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Dinny

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2024, 04:59:47 pm »
Oooh I'd have loved being the sissy wife in these corsets

Petula Petal

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2024, 11:59:10 pm »
I think Id love to wear the blue corset but not in the weather we are experiencing right now. Women were reported to faint just due to the tightness of their corsets but with our heat, it would be twice as tough to get through a day.

Marcy Little

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2024, 09:27:51 am »
I think Id love to wear the blue corset but not in the weather we are experiencing right now. Women were reported to faint just due to the tightness of their corsets but with our heat, it would be twice as tough to get through a day.
Yet, in those days, women wore the clothes and did a ton of work in them despite the weather.  Of course, not the rich ladies.
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sandrawaitress

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2024, 06:47:30 am »
I think Id love to wear the blue corset but not in the weather we are experiencing right now. Women were reported to faint just due to the tightness of their corsets but with our heat, it would be twice as tough to get through a day.
Yet, in those days, women wore the clothes and did a ton of work in them despite the weather.  Of course, not the rich ladies.

Yes, I wear a corset daily .. and still have to work. Women just had to cope, learn to endure  -and now, so do I
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SissysWife

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2024, 08:42:22 am »
Love it!
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Petula Petal

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2024, 02:32:26 pm »
Yes, I wear a corset daily .. and still have to work. Women just had to cope, learn to endure  -and now, so do I
[/quote]

My wife has a fairly modern attitude towards foundation garments and generally believes that women should not have to wear them and nor should sissy maids but she is amused by my love of corsets and garments that create a certain amount of restriction. When looking in museums or historical costumes we often comment about how tough it must have been for early settlers here in Australia in relation to the clothing. Heavy duty corsets, Linen petticoats and fairly heavy duty dresses were the order of the day irrespective of class and today for example will be about 40 to 42c or 106F if you prefer that scale. The idea of working outside dressed that way for 10-12 hours makes me feel faint at the thought of it, yet that was how life was.
I am very grateful that my wife takes pity on me and allows the minimum of clothing in this weather in exchange for being totally obedient - even that can be difficult sometimes though but there are consequences as in most things in life.
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shemyezza

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2024, 12:52:36 pm »
Nos 1,2,and 3 are very similar to the corsets I usually wear ( and if not in a full corset then definatly in a waist cincher corset) but I do love that pretty blue one ,so cute and feminin
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inhershoes

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2024, 05:53:19 pm »
It is one of my favorite items to wear. There is something about pulling those laces so tight, and you have to take small, shallow breaths. I sometimes wish I wore them more often but I don't often
Love everything feminine but enjoy being a sissy man

Petula Petal

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2024, 08:13:51 am »
I think Id love to wear the blue corset but not in the weather we are experiencing right now. Women were reported to faint just due to the tightness of their corsets but with our heat, it would be twice as tough to get through a day.
Yet, in those days, women wore the clothes and did a ton of work in them despite the weather.  Of course, not the rich ladies.

Marcy, last night my wife went to her regular dance classes and left me to do some housework. Uniform consisted of corselette, tights, knickers, a full slip, skirt and top and a fully bibbed apron. It was 27c or 81F and about 85% humidity. The floors had to be washed and scrubbed mainly and I really felt I had done a full days work although it was only 2 hours. Upon arrival home it was tea and a light supper for her followed by foot bath and massage before assisting with ablutions. I can tell you that I was soaked with sweat and all clothes had to be washed today and I fell into bed exhausted but satisfied I had done a pretty good job. however, Im thankful I dont have to be fully dressed and working like that every day although it might be a good way to lose some weight!
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SissysWife

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2024, 09:54:11 am »
You are such a fine sissy!

Marcy Little

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2024, 01:43:59 pm »
I think Id love to wear the blue corset but not in the weather we are experiencing right now. Women were reported to faint just due to the tightness of their corsets but with our heat, it would be twice as tough to get through a day.
Yet, in those days, women wore the clothes and did a ton of work in them despite the weather.  Of course, not the rich ladies.

Marcy, last night my wife went to her regular dance classes and left me to do some housework. Uniform consisted of corselette, tights, knickers, a full slip, skirt and top and a fully bibbed apron. It was 27c or 81F and about 85% humidity. The floors had to be washed and scrubbed mainly and I really felt I had done a full days work although it was only 2 hours. Upon arrival home it was tea and a light supper for her followed by foot bath and massage before assisting with ablutions. I can tell you that I was soaked with sweat and all clothes had to be washed today and I fell into bed exhausted but satisfied I had done a pretty good job. however, Im thankful I dont have to be fully dressed and working like that every day although it might be a good way to lose some weight!
[/quote

Anyone who thinks that being a sissy to a strong demanding woman is easy or a game is badly confused. When Miss B first suggested an FLR, I thought that I would get to play dress-up and sashay around the house all day.  She runs a tight ship and expects that the assignments be done on time and in good order no matter if it is 90 degrees or 0 degrees.  They make us better sissies.
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James McLaughlin

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2024, 09:51:58 pm »
Dear Marcy,
I have never been privileged to read on this platform. The 19th century was the first subject matter I saw.
Confessing here I did not read through all of the replies nor the exact clothing save for the photos that were published.
I am not a young person, I am a male, in my early seventies, handicapped in a wheelchair living by myself at this point,
My beautiful wife and mother of my four children passed away 10 years ago.
To the point here:
I was raised in a very privileged circumstance, there but luck and Grace go I.
Being born just in the post-World War II era, my circumstance was my father left for the 3rd and last time in November 1957.
Remember that so well because it's the date that was stamped on the back of the photo taken of me in a dress that my mother
wore in the late 19 teens... Maybe 1918 or so.
I have two older sisters one 22 months the other nearly 6 years. Fortunately, they have been my historians if you will, or
how I was raised and dressed. Regarding the 19th century, my outfits and the manner in which I was dressed had
a strong flavor for the 1890s, but mostly in what became a very popular but very secluded fashion her mothers to dress their
Boys after World War II, that fashion was a Resurgence of the Little Lord Fauntleroy I look from the 1890s, 19th century.
I have not been on the site before as I explained, so before I conclude I hope I can post a few photos at least those that might represent
Very closely if not exactly the outfits that I wore. If folks here are familiar with how affluent society tended to dress their children
Post World War II in France and England especially, not necessarily their children but their sons, it is an interesting world that I and many others lived in
Until in my case I was 10//11 years old. That of the fear but you subtlety fear after two world wars within 30 years basically one and a half Generations
to see so many hundreds of thousands of young men killed on either side it didn't matter. Mothers in Paris and other affluent communities in France in the lateral stages of World War II, address their teen and even late teenage boys have school girls to protect them from being taken into not necessarily military but into labor camps. Little ones who had been addressed I'm sure very elegantly when they were three to seven years old, that. Dressing boys elegantly was extended quite a bit to 11/12 years old their hair growing into a particular style called a Choupette, I hope I spelled that right.
Well if anyone's interested in my experiences with a very incredibly strong female influence during the age when my mother was an absolute great CEO of our family, we were catholic in an affluent area near Chicago. She was a single mother, you can imagine the pressures on her to remarry to have a man in the house. I am not a person who seeks anyone for a particular reason I am just at an age and being in the condition I am I would like to share my story with someone. I confess that I really did not like being a ring bearer and Page boy four times, in the late 1950s and up until the mid-60s. Nor just simply walking down the aisle on Sunday for church wearing an Eton suit, with white blouses that were not what most of the kids in the church were, and back then probably 90% of kids between boys that is between four and eight, wore the suits called Eton. Consisting of a three-button colorless hip-length jacket, with suspender shorts that were mid-thigh, knee socks folded over exactly at the bottom of the knee, saddle shoes or one-strap Mary Jane shoes, and normally a Peter Pan collar with pointed ends instead of rounded ends. I often toward the holidays wore velvet suits with waist collars Etc. I will try to post my apparently the suit I actually wore when I was 9 or 10 years old. Maybe someone reads this and thinks hey I was in the same boat. I wound up by the way finding my sister's school uniform blouses in the laundry when I was 13 or 14. What I really did not like during my whole upbringing until 10/11 years old--being told at times that my blouse collar that extended to my shoulders with the Ruffles and kept flipping up in the air that those real wings and I should be very proud that I have them. Well, that was difficult to explain to the guys in the playground at lunchtime who all saw me on a Sunday. Anyway, that's when I started dressing my sister's clothes. I was very happily married for many decades, I always kept this from everyone, but when I had the opportunity I would buy my wife Laura Ashley jumpers and blouses and things along those lines. She had a very strong understanding from my mother that I had a predilection to wear clothing that resembled what my Uncle Mike wore in the 19 I don't know twenties, probably before that so not quite 19th century but pretty close in terms of the styles. Sorry if I bored all of you people to read through this but there's a lot more to this there are some sensual things, but not for tonight. Thank you all again. I love you all though I know no one I think that we're all somehow or another Kindred Spirits and we just understand that some of us just are different but we're not wrong.
Love you, Jamie


James McLaughlin

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2024, 09:54:39 pm »
attachments I hope/ Second try

MaidRuthAnn

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Re: 19th century
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2024, 10:59:56 pm »
I wrote earlier this week about my mother desperately wanting a girl and giving
birth to me, a boy. She dressed me as a girl and called me Ruth Ann for the first
four years of my life.

Your photo led me to look up pictures of girl's clothing in the late Forties. The photos
below bring back memories of my clothing and hair style of that era, especially the
little girl with shorter blonde hair.

It's my first time doing an attachment. i hope it works.

Maid Ruth Ann  [ Guests cannot view attachments ]