Author Topic: Elizabeth Caty Stanton  (Read 785 times)

Patti59

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Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« on: April 11, 2020, 11:17:41 am »
Hello Everyone!

     The one thing that the Blog has always been about, is the Education of people to realize certain Realities and to make people aware of what is going on, as well as what has already happened.  These two elements are Important to know where we are going!  I am hoping to have postings that will help others understand perhaps Why I believe in Gender Role Reversal and the Empowerment of Women and Girls, and also to pint out the "hurdles" that Women had to overcome to get where they are today.
     With that in mind, this Posting is on ELIZABETH CATY STANTON.  Hopefully, this is going to be a Learning experience as to what had to happen for Women to start their ascendance into being Equals in Society.  I hope you Enjoy and Learn from this post!

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an abolitionist, human rights activist and one of the first leaders of the woman’s rights movement. She came from a privileged background and decided early in life to fight for equal rights for women. Stanton worked closely with Susan B. Anthony—she was reportedly the brains behind Anthony’s brawn—for over 50 years to win the women’s right to vote. Still, her activism was not without controversy, which kept Stanton on the fringe of the women’s suffrage movement later in life, though her efforts helped bring about the eventual passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave all citizens the right to vote.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s Early Life
Elizabeth was born in Johnstown, New York, on November 12, 1815, to Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston.

Elizabeth’s father was a slave owner, prominent attorney, Congressman and judge who exposed his daughter to the study of law and other so-called male domains early in her life. This exposure ignited a fire within Elizabeth to remedy laws unjust to women.

When Elizabeth graduated from Johnstown Academy at age 16, women couldn’t enroll in college, so she proceeded to Troy Female Seminary instead. There she experienced preaching of hellfire and damnation to such a degree that she had a breakdown.

The experience left her with a negative view of organized religion that followed her the rest of her life.

Marriage and Motherhood
In 1839, Elizabeth stayed in Peterboro, New York, with her cousin Gerrit Smith—who later supported John Brown’s raid of an arsenal in Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia—and was introduced to the abolitionist movement. While there, she met Henry Brewster Stanton, a journalist and abolitionist volunteering for the American Anti-Slavery Society.

Elizabeth married Henry in 1840, but in a break with longstanding tradition, she insisted the word “obey” be dropped from her wedding vows.

The couple honeymooned in London and attended the World Anti-Slavery delegation as representatives of the American Anti-Slavery Society; however, the convention refused to recognize Stanton or other women delegates.

Upon returning home, Henry studied law with Elizabeth’s father and became an attorney. The couple lived in Boston, Massachusetts, for a few years where Elizabeth heard the insights of prominent abolitionists. By 1848, they had three sons and moved to Seneca Falls, New York.

Declaration of Sentiments
Stanton bore six children between 1842 and 1859 and had seven children total: Harriet Stanton Blach, Daniel Cady Stanton, Robert Livingston Stanton, Theodore Stanton, Henry Brewster Stanton, Jr., Margaret Livingston Stanton Lawrence and Gerrit Smith Stanton. During this time, she remained active in the fight for women’s rights, though the busyness of motherhood often limited her crusading to behind-the-scenes activities.

Then, in 1848, Stanton helped organize the First Women’s Rights Convention—often called the Seneca Falls Convention—with Lucretia Mott, Jane Hunt, Mary Ann M’Clintock and Martha Coffin Wright.

Stanton helped write the Declaration of Sentiments, a document modeled after the Declaration of Independence that laid out what the rights of American women should be and compared the women’s rights struggle to the Founding Fathers’ fight for independence from the British.

The Declaration of Sentiments offered examples of how men oppressed women such as:

preventing them from owning land or earning wages
preventing them from voting
compelling them to submit to laws created without their representation
giving men authority in divorce and child custody proceedings and decisions
preventing them from gaining a college education
preventing them from participating in most public church affairs
subjecting them to a different moral code than men
aiming to make them dependent and submissive to men
Stanton read the Declaration of Sentiments at the convention and proposed women be given the right to vote, among other things. Sixty-eight women and 32 men signed the document—including prominent abolitionist Frederick Douglass—but many withdrew their support later when it came under public scrutiny.

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton
The seeds of activism had been sown within Stanton, and she was soon asked to speak at other women’s rights conventions.

In 1851, she met feminist Quaker and social reformer Susan B. Anthony. The two women could not have been more different, yet they became fast friends and co-campaigners for the temperance movement and then for the suffrage movement and for women’s rights.

As a busy homemaker and mother, Stanton had much less time than the unmarried Anthony to travel the lecture circuit, so instead she performed research and used her stirring writing talent to craft women’s rights literature and most of Anthony’s speeches. Both women focused on women’s suffrage, but Stanton also pushed for equal rights for women overall.

Her 1854 “Address to the Legislature of New York,” helped secure reforms passed in 1860 which allowed women to gain joint custody of their children after divorce, own property and participate in business transactions.

Women’s Suffrage Movement Divides
When the Civil War broke out, Stanton and Anthony formed the Women’s Loyal National League to encourage Congress to pass the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery.

In 1866, they lobbied against the 14th Amendment and 15th Amendment giving black men the right to vote because the amendments didn’t give the right to vote to women, too. Many of their abolitionist friends disagreed with their position, however, and felt that suffrage rights for black men was top priority.

In the late 1860s, Stanton began to advocate measures that women could take to avoid becoming pregnant. Her support for more liberal divorce laws, reproductive self-determination and greater sexual freedom for women made Stanton a somewhat marginalized voice among women reformers.

A rift soon developed within the suffrage movement. Stanton and Anthony felt deceived and established the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869, which focused on women’s suffrage efforts at the national level. A few months later some of their former abolitionist peers created the American Woman Suffrage Association, which focused on women’s suffrage at the state level.

By 1890, Anthony managed to reunite the two associations into the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) with Stanton at the helm. By 1896, four states had secured woman’s suffrage.

Stanton’s Later Years
In the early 1880s, Stanton co-authored the first three volumes of the History of Woman Suffrage with Matilda Joslyn Gage and Susan B. Anthony. In 1895, she and a committee of women published The Woman’s Bible to point out the Bible’s bias towards women and challenge its stance that women should be submissive to men.

The Woman’s Bible became a bestseller, but many of Stanton’s colleagues at the NAWSA were displeased with the irreverent book and formally censured her.

Though Stanton had lost some creditability, nothing would silence her passion for the women’s rights cause. Despite her declining health, she continued to fight for women’s suffrage and champion disenfranchised women. She published her autobiography, Eighty Years and More, in 1898.

Legacy of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Stanton died on October 26, 1902 from heart failure. True to form, she wanted her brain to be donated to science upon her death to debunk claims that the mass of men’s brains made them smarter than women. Her children, however, didn’t carry out her wish.

Though she never gained the right to vote in her lifetime, Stanton left behind a legion of feminist crusaders who carried her torch and ensured her decades-long struggle wasn’t in vain.

Almost two decades after her death, Stanton’s vision finally came true with the passing of the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920, which guaranteed American woman the right to vote.

Sources
Address to the Legislature of New York, 1854. National Park Service.

Declaration of Sentiments. National Park Service.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Biography. Biography.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton. National Park Service.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. VCU Libraries Social Welfare History Project.

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton Biography. PBS.

Citation Information
Article Title
Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Author
History.com Editors

Website Name
HISTORY

URL
https://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/elizabeth-cady-stanton

Access Date
April 11, 2020

Publisher
A&E Television Networks

Last Updated
November 20, 2019

Original Published Date
November 9, 2009

TAGSWOMEN'S HISTORY
BY HISTORY.COM EDITORS
FACT CHECK: We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, click here to contact us!

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Strong Women are the future!

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RadicalFeminist

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2020, 03:47:38 pm »
Thanks, Patti for sharing the details about Elizabeth Caty Stanton. She is one of my heroes. In 4th grade, I presented a school report on her and the importance women played in helping shape the world we live in today.  While I have not verified it, I have been told she is a distant cousin of my great grandmother.

Here is a toast to an amazing woman who helped inspire crazy radicals like me to carry the torch of feminism forward into the 21 century and beyond. 
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Patti59

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2020, 04:50:23 pm »
Hi Chris!
     I knew you would like my first choice in this series.  That would be very enlightening to find out if you are one of her distant relatives!   Strong Women must have it in their genes!!!    I remember a lot of the sharing you did with my about your Aunt Donna, what an Incredible Woman.....if she and I would have been in the same area, maybe a could have been her "sissy"!   
    What I really Note here in her (Elizabeth Caty Stanton) Declaration of Sentiments is this one in particular:

aiming to make them dependent and submissive to men

I just find this so ironic!   The people that send hateful messages to me because of advocating for Gender Role Reversal don't seem to have any problem with what men had done to Women and Girls in the past.  The sheer thought of a man being submissive to a Woman sets these people "On Fire".   Well. thanks to great Women as Stanton and yourself, the "Shoe is going onto the other foot"...or is the male's cases, the high heel!

Thanks for your Great Work for Womankind!
Strong Women are the future!
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RadicalFeminist

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2020, 06:41:53 pm »
Hater are going to hate. Most people today don't know or refuse to admit that it has only been about 40 to 50 years that women actually had any real rights. Even today, I question if women and men are on the same playing field. What too many even women fear is the roles being reversed will break society. I personally think its the opposite is so called equal society does not really work. One gender needs to control things and the other needs the soft pretty submissive helpers. It is now time women were the in charge wearing the pants! 
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Patti59

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2020, 07:46:29 am »
As usual Chris, you are So Correct!
      There is the point that both you and I have discussed for many years.  Women can sometimes be their own Worse Enemy!   That is why I emphasize so much, that if Women do not want the Role Reversals to happen, they will not happen.  There is so much Encouragement today, seeing so many young Women taking the Lead Roles in relationships.  More Women and Girls playing competitive Sports, which in the past, and even to some extent today, other Women do not like.  Unfortunately, the Values of the World will not change just because we want them to be different.  Power is what it takes to Control things, whether that be Economic, Physical, Intellectual or Spiritual....it all comes down to some type of Power.  Those with the Power, will make the Rules.  By Girls and Women learning how to Compete, by playing sports in many instances, it makes them learn what Power is. 
   At the same time, as men and boys are being Encouraged to embrace their feminine sides, it does weaken them, and creates the Opportunity for Women to Dominate.  For some, this seems to be "repulsive", however, these same people had no problems insisting that Women and Girls be "Prissy" and "helpless".  These same people realize, Power will Control, and they just do not want to see Women being Powerful.  So when the Women Take Charge, and feminize their males, it shows that the Power belongs with the Female, and that the "Unequalness" continues, but it is now the Female that is the Stronger, and the male is the weaker.  It is a reality, but it is just how human nature works!
Strong Women are the future!
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RadicalFeminist

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2020, 07:56:30 pm »
There is an interesting dynamic (brutal truth) of society very few people discuss. The reality is only a small group of alphas really control society, the rest of us are nothing more than sheep. 50 years ago all males had some level of power over all women and children. They were the Man of the House, King of their Castle and in all most all social occasions women were expected to obey males even boys had power over their mothers and sisters. If a women challenge this authority she would be punished. Over the last 50 years this has changed no longer will women just sit there and take males bullshit. Unfortunately, most males still think they are the King of their Castle and this has led to the rise of toxic masculinity. The alphas do not really care about gender roles anymore all they can about is staying in power and keeping the sheep in line. They learn that by pitting the different sides against each other the sheep will fight between themselves and totally accept the alpha rules. I do not see this dynamic changing anytime soon; my personal goal is for women to become the alphas. Once we control society we can set the rules, hopefully these female alphas are smart and share the power with all women. Time will tell a lot of the older alpha males are starting to die off so there is going to be a vacuum. Smart empowered women need to seize this opportunity.
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Patti59

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2020, 07:43:45 am »
You really got down to the Essence of this series of Posts, and the posts in the future will continue to showcase these Extraordinary Woman and Girls.  The dynamic has surely changed, and it is because of the Courageous Women that went against the "Norms", that made it happen.  Women need to understand that they were kept down in the past not because they could not do the Activities or Tasks, but because they were Not allowed! 
Strong Women are the future!
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RadicalFeminist

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Re: Elizabeth Caty Stanton
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2020, 08:39:29 pm »
Yes, speak the truth. We (Women) need to take advantage of the opportunity at hand to seize control and drive society to benefit women. Its long past time for Female Privilege!
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